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Altering pacifism -hindrance in your games

Pacifism hindrance

Pacifism is a type of hindrance/disadvantage/flaw that works very differently in different types of games. In most games I play or run, no-one would take the pacifism unless there's a work-a-round against it's limitations - and I can't blame anyone for that, as these games usually have at least one combat each session, and usually everyone's most eagerly waiting for those combats! And they often are the most exciting parts of a game session.

Savage Worlds: Random Hindrance generator

Savage Worlds Fan product

This tool is meant for inspiration in character creation, both pc's and npc's. You easily choose the 'safe' options' unless you are presented suggestions, which may get your imagination running and give birth to a refreshingly different character. So if you want inspiration for a new character

Pulut (Pigeons) - scratchbuilt wedding cake decoration

Pulut (Pigeons) - the comic wedding cake decoration

I've been drawing Pulut -sarjakuva (Pigeons -comics) for a Finnish young's community site, and like I've often drawn these pigeons to guestbooks and in greetings, I decided to create a decoration for our wedding cake of these comic characters. The same theme was seen in wedding invitation, where one pigeon 'accidentally' prod a ring closer to another pigeon - and the wedding cake decoration was made from this picture.

Gaming terrain: Fountain with streaming water (tutorial)

Close-up of the fountain -model

It's time for another terrain -related article, this time it's one of my personal favourites. The fountain can be used in almost any genre as they are present everywhere, and modelling streaming water was an interesting project. This article shows you phase by phase how the model was made, allowing you to create fountains and other water-filled elements of your own.

Make your players love their character's flaws

What flaws do you think this character has?

In a recent discussion about roleplaying mechanics I heard an opinion mentioning that character flaws should be a disadvantage and therefore rewarding well for playing them isn't something that should be done. My way of looking at flaws is completely opposite. While flaws are in general supposed to be a tool of balancing (or in practice min-maxing) characters, they work best as a tool to bring atmosphere, good story and drama to a game. And for this purpose, they work best if players want their flaws to cause them problems.

Asikkala home farm model, finished

Childhood home farm - old buildings

Shortly in Finnish: Tämä on pienoismalli lapsuuden kotitilastani Asikkalassa. Materiaalina on käytetty pääasiassa pahvia ja pienoismalli on upotettu lasikantisen sohvapöydän sisään. Jouduin tekemään pöytään ylimääräisen välipohjan valkopintaisesta vaneerista, muuten tämä malli oli sopivin pienoismallia varten.

Salmon decorational model

Salmon -decorational model

Salmon -decorational model

A non-gaming post this time; As readers of this site are mostly gamers, I'll say a few words for this piece's gaming use too; it's not difficult to stretch one's brains to have an idea of using this decorational model as a giant fish the PC's must fight (or can summon!) The model can also be thought a miniature.

Character creation: Flaws make the character

"My character is ready. What? Oh, I need to get some flaws to pay off all the extra stuff I've already picked. But my character is perfect... Now, what flaws would have least effect on my character?"

Sounds familiar? All too familiar to me. Most of my players want to think of all those munchkiny statistics and features first, and then, if the system has a mechanism for negative features (flaws, hindrances, disadvantages, whatever they are called), they try to find something that doesn't hinder their character. I confess, I'm guilty of that too.

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