Shaper & Maker

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My kid(s) will some day be old enough to play too...

I'm most fascinated about an idea of being able to run games for my kid(s) some day. And not just for fun; rpg's work well for educational purposes too. You can use games to teach kids historical facts, lessons about behavior and moral and other useful things while having fun!

Savage Cyberworld, session 6: Getting spooky. REALLY spooky.

Checking Chernobyl Mect's platform

After the last job, PC's had been getting some cyber and healing. Before they could leave for well-deserved vacation, Ivan got two calls. First, Ivan's police contact called and told Ivan that Italian mafia has put a price on his head (and hindrance was updated to major) - in the last session, the Italians closed with no guns when Ivan & Emanuele turned the confrontation lethal.

Savage Cyberworld, session 5: A job worth a million

Fight in the restaurant

In the last session, the pc's got a million dollar job from their new big employer. Tony was killed by Joker's missed grenade attack, and this time we had two new characters in play. One of them was actually the first character created, but the player hadn't been able to get in the game in earlier sessions. Ivan 'The rat' is a bit  untidy fixer and Emanuele is an assassin with cyber legs who's quite nerd, playing often a assassin -themed computer game and also talking about it to everyone (who are not interested). Player of Agnes wasn't present.

Make your players love their character's flaws

What flaws do you think this character has?

In a recent discussion about roleplaying mechanics I heard an opinion mentioning that character flaws should be a disadvantage and therefore rewarding well for playing them isn't something that should be done. My way of looking at flaws is completely opposite. While flaws are in general supposed to be a tool of balancing (or in practice min-maxing) characters, they work best as a tool to bring atmosphere, good story and drama to a game. And for this purpose, they work best if players want their flaws to cause them problems.

Initiative tracker/PC info sheet to be used with 4E *Updated*

Initiative tracking sheet preview

A little but invaluable tool I've used in my 4E games. I mark up player characters' passive perceptions and insights, plus any other important notes (that don't need to be secret) on this sheet, and when it's time to fight, initiatives are easy to mark on the left side of the sheet.

Below the tables there's a large empty space; you'll find use for it when you start calculating hp's of the enemies!

Character creation: Flaws make the character

"My character is ready. What? Oh, I need to get some flaws to pay off all the extra stuff I've already picked. But my character is perfect... Now, what flaws would have least effect on my character?"

Sounds familiar? All too familiar to me. Most of my players want to think of all those munchkiny statistics and features first, and then, if the system has a mechanism for negative features (flaws, hindrances, disadvantages, whatever they are called), they try to find something that doesn't hinder their character. I confess, I'm guilty of that too.

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